From Inkden Tattoo Studio and Laser Removal Clinic -Ex The Dragons Den in Blackpool Lancashire United Kingdom.

 

 

For the past 10 years I have based my artistic style on biomechanical and organic designs, incorporating this into not only my tattoos but other projects also.

 

Mechanical tattoos are, as the name suggests, tattoos based on mechanical parts and machinery. They are meant to give the human body a cyborg or half-machine look, with “visible” mechanical parts. This is where the ‘bio’ in ‘biomechanical’ comes from- it is a combination of a bio-organic structure (such as the human body) with mechanical components. The best thing about this style of tattoo, in my opinion, is that they work well on any area of the body.

There are several kinds of mechanical and biomechanical tattoos. The most popular version, and one you’ve probably seen yourself, is the style that appears as though the skin has ripped and is revealing the mechanical part such as this below

 

 

 

Which can very depend on the way the skin was damaged and inside which is reviled
Each of these tattoos can vary depending on the way the skin is damage and what the inside that is being exposed looks like.

 

 

Revealing a full range of mechanical internal body parts, which includes cogs, wires, metal joints, and springs.
The exposed mechanical components can range between a wide assortment of items including cogs, wires, metal joints and springs, to name a few. These parts create a visual mechanical representation of the internal structure of that particular area of the body.

 

 

This style is usually seen in black and grey, though some prefer to make it more “realistic” by also mixing in human body parts such as veins and muscle in coloured form. Some go for a 3d-like effect in order to make the piece even more impressive to look at- for example this picture of one of my clients tattoos, in which we integrated a portrait of his son in to the bio-mechanical surrounding;

 

Others prefer a more creative mechanical tattoo, one that doesn’t involve a lot of realism. This version involves the same mechanical parts, but with other designs such as clocks and compasses as the centrepiece, and the mechanical aspects is used as a defining and personalising aspects to an alternative design;

 

 

In the photo above the mechanical parts act like complementary pieces to the main design, even though they still compose a large portion of the piece.

 

 

Mechanical tattoos have a lot of tiny details, which makes them a more costly style than others. Depending on the stamina of the tattoo artist and the pain threshold of the client, multiple sessions may be needed in order to finish larger pieces. The pieces compose of blacks and greys, but that does not mean that they aren’t using just as many different inks as colour tattoos. In order to create realistic looking designs a lot of time and preparation is needed prior to the tattoo itself, and during the tattoo a lot of time and attention is needed in order to produce highly detailed, quality pieces.

 

 

Though mechanical tattoos look great on pretty much any part of the body, there are still certain spots that are generally see as the best places to have them. This includes arms, legs, feet and

ribs.

 

A full biomechanical sleeve can look really gorgeous, with the curves and contours having less of on impact of the overall design that what you might think. If you’re in the market for a large tattoo piece then you can’t go wrong with a mechanical tattoo!

 

 

Below are a few images of the best type of mechanical tattoos for men. Most of these are black and grey, which is no doubt the best format for a mechanical tattoo. If you want more colours, you can work with the tattoo artist to create a more colourful design.

 

 

I have done a few projects where I have drawn free hand designs, which means I didn’t use a stencil but drew my own image straight on to the client’s skin. This gives a slightly abstract look, but the end tattoo has a very unique form and follows the body’s natural flow. The design below is a freehand piece, and took 16 hours of tattooing to complete.

 

 

Another tattoo like the one above is the image below, done in the same fashion. The piece in this image is 3 years old, and has healed and aged well;

 

One more example of this style is this image below;

 

For more examples of my work go to:
Below is a time lapse of the tattooing process of the last two images I posted above, which you can find on our Youtube channel. Follow the link to see the full channel:

 

 

 

 

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *